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  • 17.12.2018
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The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating . Carole Radziwill . Macmillan

Carole's Dating Tips

If you are looking for the perfect fast- paced, lighthearted, humorous novel, consider your search to be over. Radziwill's novel is the perfect book for your solo reading or your next book club. The title is tongue-in-cheek, so you won't find yourself delving into deep grief issues. Instead, you will be carving out time to lose yourself in this splendid novel. Humor permeates Radziwill's writing, and the dialogue is flawless. The reader is quickly drawn Claire's cluttered life. Clare was married to Charles Bryne, a sexologist and well-known author.

The saddest part of all is that the main character is supposed to be I am 32 ish and love classic movies and even I did not get most of the references she made to pop culture.

This seemed more like a character who was 32 in Jul 06, Michele rated it did not like it. This was a terrible book. There was no plot and no point of this whatsoever.

I cannot believe the author thought she could write fiction and that this even got published.

I wish she had used a ghostwriter. View 1 comment. Feb 22, Caryne rated it it was ok. I was so excited for this book, and it just fell flat. Such potential since the author's writing style is lovely at times; however, it was just a bore with zero character development. A thirty-something's older husband dies unexpectedly, and she is left to navigate widowhood, dating and sex.

Breezy and smart, this is elevated chick lit, with a very New York vibe. Mar 07, Bobbi rated it liked it. I just finished reading this book.

Although it is quite different in style and focus than "What Remains", it obviously covers some of the same ground. There are some very funny moments, but I don't think this is the "chick lit" book some have described it to be. Underneath the fictional story, she also addressed what I suspect are some timeless truths of dealing with being widowed.

I recognized some of what she discussed from talks I had with my mother and she was widowed almost sixty years ago I just finished reading this book.

I recognized some of what she discussed from talks I had with my mother and she was widowed almost sixty years ago now. Claire, the main character, also is a writer. Having been involved in this discussion of Bookgate today, made me particularly sensitive to what Carole said about writing and how she feels about it. This book explains a great deal about how special writing is to her and how she reveres writers and the product. Although I agreed with her basic position regarding this whole mess on the show, this book just reinforced for me, how she feels.

Reading this book is a completely different experience than reading "What Remains", as it should be. I recommend it. I like the way Carole writes and I enjoyed her first attempt at fiction.

It is my hope that she continues to write fiction because I'm really looking forward to reading her next book. Aug 29, Terri rated it it was amazing. Personally I love this book I'm slightly baffled by some of the other reviews and can only think that the disappointment stems from mismanaged expectations.

This is not a continuation of the author's original memoir - no one person should have more than one memoir's worth of heartbreak. If you expect this book to be like the author's first work, you will be disappointed. This is not an actual manual for widows with step Personally I love this book This is not an actual manual for widows with step by step instructions of what's to come. If you expect this, you will be disappointed.

This is not a grand sweeping novel or a literary experience that will haunt you for months to come and mentioning it at dinner parties will most likely not impress anyone enough to either get you laid or up your status as an intellectual snob. Just read the Thornbirds or some Garcia if this is what you seek. This is a fun book, one that you can spend an afternoon on the couch with and feel at ease like with an old friend, one that will make you smirk, smile, and sometimes giggle as you traverse its pages.

It's not overly complicated, doesn't try to be unnecessarily deep. It's open and honest and very well written and a bit of genius all in itself. Apr 16, Dana rated it really liked it. The bizarre and tragic accident that crushed Claire's husband to death set the tone for the book: humorous yet serious, and was similar to the style of books like The Year Old Man. Recently widowed Claire provided a perspective on the uncharted territory of sex and dating after death.

This was a grown up chic lit comedy perfect for a summer day. I loved the life rules embedded in the text, each one more clever than the last! I enjoyed following Claire as she attempted to live life while dispelling the stigma of being a widow. Who knew having a relationship after your spouse died would be so hard!

Just when I thought I had a handle in the story, something unexpected popped up. Claire's dating disasters were funny, especially when her soon to be lover donned her dead husband's robe. Radziwill included great one line zingers throughout the story, and I found my self smiling while I followed Claire on her journey to reclaim her life and find love. Overall, this was a cute and clever book I'm glad I read.

Jul 06, Joni Daniels rated it it was ok. Regretably, much of the book tries too hard to be clever, and the gems like that are overshadowed. The book is another variation of the wealthy, privildeged, name-dropping, people-magazine observations of Claire, the recently widowed wife of Charlie, a noted sexologist.

Her reflections about writing are well considered, as are those of widowhood and her 'rules' carry a kernel of "Blue Skies can be misleading," written on the very first page, is an example of what a good writer the author can be.

Her reflections about writing are well considered, as are those of widowhood and her 'rules' carry a kernel of experienced truth. But overall - I began to feel like the author was trying too hard to impress the reader.

Her novel The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is a fictional work, but the best personal life and I'm sure this has added intrigue to its sales. Claire Byrne comes piteously undone after Charlie, her imperious husband and a best-selling sexologist, is beaned by a knockoff pound. Carole Radziwill's debut novel, The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating earns five out of five stars. Radziwill's novel is the perfect book for your.

It was distracting and became annoying. Feb 08, Jennifer rated it really liked it. This book is dry and witty and I enjoyed it in a beach read kind of way.

The plot is centered on Claire dealing with the accident that crushed her husband to death, and while this may not seem funny, it is in an ironic NYC way. She then sets out to determine how to have a life while being newly labeled a widow. She lays down some rules she learns along the way, which are embedded in the book itself.

The Widow’s Guide to Sex and Dating

Her sexual and dating encounters were always over the top, but having never been a year-old, h This book is dry and witty and I enjoyed it in a beach read kind of way. Her sexual and dating encounters were always over the top, but having never been a year-old, hot, newly widowed woman in NYC, who am I to judge?

Overall, I'm glad I read this book. Jan 28, Nancy Sharp rated it really liked it.

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel [Carole Radziwill] on Amazon. com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Radziwill's delicious debut novel is a. On Sale: 10/20/ The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker. The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is a comedy about a widowed young New Yorker who wants to recapture the type of love she never had.

This was a hoot to read -- and I feel especially poised to render such commentary given that I, too, was widowed young in New York City at a time when every new venture reflected the profoundness of my seemingly singular experience. While these characters are extreme in their sensibilities, they are dear to hold.

Radziwell is funny, funny, funny. She has written a real page- turner and I enjoyed every moment. Dec 30, Sasha Strader rated it really liked it. There's a very different pace to this book than I had expected. It isn't a campy, laugh-a-minute chick lit novel or a mopey tale of woe. Frankly, I feel it is probably more truthful minus the celebrities to what a widow actually goes through than any book I've read to date. I really enjoyed the protagonist's wry wit as she pulled herself to a new normal.

Mar 26, Connie Weiss rated it really liked it Shelves: memoirs. I read this book as a fan of Carole Radziwill's writing, having previously read her other book recently.

I enjoyed this book very much and actually imagined Carole as the main character and heard her voice in my head while reading it. This is a fun read even though it deals with death and grief. View all 4 comments. Jan 13, Lauren rated it liked it Shelves: netgalley.

I like Carole Radziwill.

The widows guide to sex and dating sales

I liked her writing in this book. It was funny and light hearted. I thought the main character was a bit whiny but she made the best of her situation. The story, though, got really confusing for me towards the end. It took time to figure out who or what was doing what. I am hoping though, that Ms. Radziwill will be writing more.

I'm a fan. Dec 12, Kat rated it did not like it Shelves: first-reads. I enjoy watching the Real Housewives of where ever after a long stressful day of work, its the perfect mindless entertainment, for an hour I don't have to think and can relax.

However, it was much li I enjoy watching the Real Housewives of where ever after a long stressful day of work, its the perfect mindless entertainment, for an hour I don't have to think and can relax. However, it was much like an episode of The Real Housewives, mindless entertainment, just not as good. Claire Bryne, a thirty something, is a widow.

Her husband, suddenly killed, by a sculpture falling from the sky.

Charlie Bryne, is a well know sexologist and author, best know for his philosophy that love and sex cannot coexist. We know sex didn't exist in his marriage to Claire, but it never feels like love existed either. Claire bumbles through her first year of widowhood, anxiously awaiting loosing her widow virginal cherry, going on many bad dates and seeing numerous therapist types. Nothing really ever happens though and thats the problem with this book.

It started out strong, Radziwell is a good writer, she is able to craft beautiful passages about nothing, it's to bad she cannot craft a plot with the same beauty. The novel starts strong and I enjoy her talking about how it was a beautiful day when Charlie died, bright blue skies, wonderful weather. Tragedies always happen when the sky is blue - and that statement feels true. The way that Radziwell discusses what each person who was attached to Charlie or the sculpture was doing around the time of his death and how all these events came together to ultimately culminate in Charlie's death was fascinating.

Charlie, despite his ego and fame, was one small part of a bigger story of the world continuing to move on.

Once Charlie is dead and all we have left is his one dimensional unlikeable wife and her crew of unlikeable friends and dates the novel nosedives quickly. Claire Brynes has no depth, she never seems like a grieving widow, only a very shallow socialite who is more concerned with maintaining a social status and landing a new wealthy husband so she can continue to basically do and be nothing. Her friends are just like her, nobody feels like a real person, the situations they are in are not relatable and the dialogue feels very forced.

I will continue to indulge in Real Housewives episodes but perhaps this will be the last book I read by a Real Housewife. I received a free copy of this book from First Reads in exchange for a fair review After Claire's husband is abruptly killed by a priceless piece of art she not only has to readjust to life on her own, but she also has to cope with all the implications and stigmatisations of being classed as a widow.

The married women in her social circle suddenly see her as a husband seducing vixen so they attempt to eliminate the competition by setting her up with all sorts of inappropriate but available men.

And as the weeks pass by and Claire endures one disastrous date after another, she After Claire's husband is abruptly killed by a priceless piece of art she not only has to readjust to life on her own, but she also has to cope with all the implications and stigmatisations of being classed as a widow.

And as the weeks pass by and Claire endures one disastrous date after another, she feels the increasing pressure of losing her widowed virginity. The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating started off very quirky and interesting but it quickly went downhill after that. My main issue with the novel, and particularly main character Claire, is that despite the tragic accident that sets up the story there is very little to be found within the pages that showed she is grieving for her late husband.

As a sexologist in life he had a unique approach to their marriage, claiming that relationships are either sex or love but never the two together, yet despite his ideas on the matter she seemed to care deeply for him so it is peculiar that almost as soon as he passed away she felt the need to move on to someone else.

Her slew of therapists and gurus makes me believe she has a real issue making any decisions for herself, so perhaps the fruitless attempts at replacing her husband so swiftly had more to do with her own fears of being alone rather than a lack of compassion for the man she was married to.

Nonetheless, the easy way with which she seemed to dismiss her late husband and her marriage made her come across egoistical rather than sympathetic and made it very hard to care for her and her struggles.

What also made it rather difficult to get stuck in to this book is that it was hard to classify. At times it read like a chick-lit, at others as erotica and there were even hints of an old-fashioned detective buried underneath. However, because it is all over the place it ended up being none of the above. The novel would've benefitted from author Carole Radziwill choosing one genre to focus on, as well as more of a plot than "a new widow goes through a series of dates".

In all it certainly wasn't quite so terrible that I didn't finish it, but I did struggle with the increasingly bland storyline until I was relieved when I turned the last page. Dec 22, Michelle rated it liked it Shelves: books-i-own, fictionfirstreads.

It was a quick read, and definitely strikes me as the kind of novel that would be ideal to pick up in an airport bookstore. Basically, Claire Byrne's husband, Charlie, dies at the beginning of the novel, the casualty of a fake Giacometti sculpture Why does it need to be a fake? Because Giacometti has been faked?

I never figured that one out. Because it added some depth? Because it was a quirky detail for a quirky novel filled with quirky characters? Charlie is a sexologist who believes that sex and love cannot coexist within the same relationship whoa, mansplainingso while he "loves" Claire, she's pretty much been there to support him since they married.

Claire abandoned her own work and focused on Charlie, so when he dies, she's left with little other than his unfinished book about Hollywood's sex-icon, Jack Huxley.

So, because Claire has nothing really of her own except for a short story about sex and Woody Allen called "Hustling Woody" that she published long agoshe's the perfect vessel for everyone else's ideas about what a widow should be.

She sees two therapists, a psychic, and a botanomanist so that they can tell her what to do. Eventually her friend Sasha convinces her to date, and her husband's publisher convinces her to work on her late husband's book. I hate this guy, so I should not go on a second date, but maybe see the guy I just dislike again. This book feels a lot like an episode of "Sex and the City," where Miranda is pressured into behaving like Samantha and has to find the happy medium after her husband dies, with the addition of the idea of widowhood as a "new virginity" to lose.

A lot of it was kind of dumb, and incredibly unrelatable for those of us that aren't Manhattan socialites. Additionally, the author is apparently a "Real Housewife of New York," so I guess she's used to a certain amount of fictionalized reality. Maybe that's why most of this book doesn't really ring true.

Still, it's entertainment, and it's chick lit made quirky and privileged. I would probably recommend to fans of "Housewives" or "Sex and the City" I don't fall into those categories.

Mar 19, Diane rated it really liked it. Claire Byrne is married to Charlie, a reknowned sexologist, author of many books on the subject. One day, he is killed by a huge statue falling from a crane on Fifth Avenue in New York. Claire finds herself a widow in her 30s and completely lost as to what to do next.

She goes to two different therapists, visits psychics and even follows a griot, a storyteller who travels the city sharing stories about famous New York City dwellers, to try and find her way to a new life.

Then she meets Jack Huxle Claire Byrne is married to Charlie, a reknowned sexologist, author of many books on the subject. Then she meets Jack Huxley, the notoriously heterosexual movie star whom every woman wants, and has some sort of relationship with him.

“The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel,” is a smart and funny satire about loss, libido and true love. Claire is a young widow and the.

Throughout the novel, Claire shares the rules she is learning about sex and dating for widows, like Rule "Never discourage anyone who continues to make progress, no matter how slow" Plato Rule A boy says, "Have a good trip", a man says "Call me when you land. Kennedy and his wife Carolyn in a plane crash. It is a brilliant book, and so I was interested to see what her fiction would be like. This is definitely a book for anyone who loves to immerse themselves in the wealthy NYC culture; those who religiously watch The Real Housewives of New York City will love it and Radziwill is a cast member of that show.

Claire is an interesting character, a little snarky, and her journey through widowhood the depression, the setups with widowers forty years older rings true. She is trying to find her place after being in the shadow of her famous husband, what her friend describes as "Charlie's Sundance to Claire's Butch Cassidy.

The best part of the book are the Jack Huxley sections. Huxley clearly is meant to be George Clooney, and Radziwill dated Clooney years ago, which makes this novel all the more delicious.

The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating

I'm not sure Clooney will be thrilled though. Fans of Gigi Levangie's books The Starter Wife will like this one; there is the same mix of humor and poignancy. Mar 29, Alison Diem rated it liked it Shelves: literature, fiction. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I really enjoyed the prose in the book, and for the most part, even enjoyed Claire's dating shenanigans. I went in knowing this was big "L" literature, as opposed to a romance novel, so there was no expectation for a happy ending on my part. And because I knew it was literature, it didn't bother me that there wasn't a whole lot happening, in terms of plot.

I found the prose beautiful and the journey interesting, mostly because she wasn't a weepy mess. The loss of her husband wasn't the worst thing I really enjoyed the prose in the book, and for the most part, even enjoyed Claire's dating shenanigans. The loss of her husband wasn't the worst thing that could happen to her, as it has been portrayed in so many other novels, and the soul searching she does to determine just what her husband meant to her is refreshing and different.

I was sad that her relationship with Huxley went nowhere, although we were told that's what would happen from the beginning. The romance reader in me wondered if this would be the case where Claire was able to change him because of their connection, but no, this wasn't that book.

Perhaps for the better. Kristin Meekhof KM : You write in your book, "The first year of widowhood is specifically set aside for awkwardness. Carole Radziwill CR : I spoke to young widows about their first year and we all had similar experiences.

You are suddenly single in a couple's world. It makes dinner seating difficult. And its not a bonding experience with other girlfriends in the way divorce may be. Death is universally acknowledged to be awkward. KM: Jack seems perfect -- a hero at just the right time to enter a vulnerable widow's life. Widows are looking for comfort after a tragic event, like a husband's death. Did you have this in mind when you created this character?

Carole Radziwill Talks about Her Sex Dream with Bethenny - People

CR: Oh no. Quite the opposite. It would be wise advice to avoid a Jack Huxley if you are feeling vulnerable or looking for comfort. Claire even says if she were lucky she'd have dinner with Jack and walk away non-plussed, that she'd find his narcissism a bore.

But of course Claire wasn't lucky. She did have a dead husband after all, and so, she fell. I was interested in creating a man that every women could immediately identify whether they had ever met a movie star or not.

We all have these sorts of men in our head. KM: I'm often curious how authors select names for their characters. How did you choose Huxley, Jack?

CR: It's such a good question because a name can be everything and they are more difficult then one imagines. And, well, Jack is the name of all heroes. I love the idea of mixing fiction with reality. So I wrote Jack as a character who was related to the real-life great novelist Aldous Huxley, who also had a brief but bright Hollywood career. I looked at Aldous' Huxley's family tree and it would be quite plausible that he'd have a nephew of Jack's age. KM: Often authors project part of their personal experiences into their writing.

Is Claire a combination of women you know -- not names?

CR: Like all characters in novels they are both real and imagined. Claire is no exception. She is certainly part of me, perhaps the essence of me and my imagination. She is how I think, and what I observe. But inspiration knows no gender because Charlie is also a part of me. For one thing, we are both neurotically obsessed with all things sexual.

CR: Definitely not. I wrote that in as dialogue at the very end. A friendly nod. KM: Tell me a little about your writing process. Did you have a complete outline in mind before you started with the first chapter or did you write the first three chapters and then decide on the ending?

CR: Writing a novel was much different than writing my memoir. With my first book I had a very good sense of where I would start and how I would end.

Those were written first and it was much more structured. Writing fiction is more creative, it ebbed and flowed.

The Paperback of the The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating: A Novel by Carole Radziwill at Barnes & Noble. Sales rank: , Product. The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker hell-bent on recapturing a . In Carole Radziwill's new novel, “The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating,” the main character, a woman whose husband died five months earlier.

I did not ever have a complete outline in my head. After I got Claire through the funeral of her husband and onto dating I wasn't sure what would happen to her. If she'd find meaning in her life, or love, or both. Writing fiction is much like living life, you never know how and why one story begins and another ends. I learned to color outside the lines.

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